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Help and advice for KILDYSART

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KILDYSART

In 1868, the parish of Kildysart contained the following places:

"KILLADYSERT, (or Kildysert And Islands), a parish and post village in the barony of Clonderlaw, county Clare, province of Munster, Ireland, 13 miles S. of Ennis, and 149 from Dublin. The parish is 7 miles long by 4 broad. It is situated at the confluence of the estuaries of the Shannon and Fergus, and includes the island of Innishark, with several islets. The soil is of medium quality. The road from Ennis to Kilrush follows the coast. Loughs Gortglass and Cloonsnaghta are two small lakes in the interior. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Killaloe, value with two others, £451. The church was erected in 1814 by the late Board of First Fruits. There are a Roman Catholic chapel and two hedge-schools. Opposite Innishark stands the village, containing a police station, where petty sessions are held. Many of the inhabitants are occupied in bringing provisions for the Limerick market. Part of the demesne of Cahiracon is within this parish. Fairs are held on the 22nd May, 15th July, and 27th August.

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2018