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Help and advice for An 1868 Gazetteer description of the following places in

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An 1868 Gazetteer description of the following places in


KILLEHENNY

"KILLEHENNY, a parish in the barony of Iraghticonnor, county Kerry, province of Munster, Ireland, 8 miles W.N.W. of Listowel. Tarbert is its post town. The parish contains the villages of Ballybunian and Ahaphond. The surface lies to the N. of the mouth of the river Cashen. It is somewhat mountainous and boggy. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe, value with Listowel, £335. There are a Roman Catholic chapel and a hedge-school. Tullamore is the principal residence. Limestone is abundant."

"AHAPHOND, (or Ahaphona), a village in the parish of Killehenny, barony of Iraghticonnor, in the county of Kerry, province of Munster, Ireland, 8 miles to the S.W. of Ballylongford.

"BALLYBUNIAN, (or Ballybanyan), a village in the parish of Killehenny, and barony of Iraghticonnor, in the county of Kerry, province of Munster, Ireland, 9 miles to the N.W. of Listowel. It is seated in a very pleasant spot on the coast of a bay at the mouth of the river Shannon, and is become a favourite bathing place. Near the village, on the north, is Knockanure Hill, and the line of cliffs between Ballybunian and Kilconly Point is of the most picturesque and remarkable character. There are many caverns and passages of curious form, some of them of considerable extent. The Pigeon Cave is about 70 feet in height. Waterfalls occur at several points, and on the summit of the cliffs are remains of the castles of Doon and Ballybunian. A salmon fishery is established here.

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]
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