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Help and advice for TREVETHAN, Monmouthshire - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

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TREVETHAN, Monmouthshire - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"TREVETHAN, a parish in the upper division of Abergavenny hundred, county Monmouth, 7 miles from Usk, and 1 mile from Pontypool. It is situated near the Brecon and Monmouthshire canals and the river Afon Llwyd. The parish contains the townships of Aberyschan, Pontnewydd, and Pont-y-pool, the last being a polling place for the county and a petty sessions town. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the collieries, lime-pits, and extensive iron-works, chiefly at Pont-y-pool [which see].

The surface is hilly, the highest point being Mynydd-Maen, which has an elevation of 1,531 feet above sea-level. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Llandaff, and in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. Caduca, or Cadocus, was restored in 1847, besides which there is an additional church erected in 1832. There are also the district churches of Abersychan and Pontenwydd, the livings of which are perpetual curacies, value £150 each. There are chapels for the Independents and Wesleyans."

"ABERYSCHAN GELLYWOOD, a village in the parish of Trevethan, hundred of Abergavenny, in the county of Monmouth, 2 miles N.W. of Pont-y-pool. It is situated at the junction of the river Sychan with the Afon, and in the neighbourhood of the British iron-works. The living is a curacy, value £44, in the diocese of Llandaff, and in the patronage of the incumbent."

"CRUMLIN, a hamlet in the parish of Trevethan, in the county of Monmouth, 3½ miles S.W: of Pontypool. It is situated on the canal which joins Brecon canal near Newport, and is a station on the Taff Vale Extension of the West Midland railway."

"NIGHTINGIRLE, a village in the parish of Trevethan, county Monmouth, 1 mile from Pontypool. It is situated near the river Afon and the Brecon canal."

"PONTNEWYDD, a hamlet in the parish of Trevethan, county Monmouth, 3 miles from Pontypool, and 5 from Newport. It is a station on the Hereford, Abergavenny, and Newport section of the West Midland railway. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the tin works. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Llandaff, value £150. The church is a modern structure."

"PONTYPOOL, a township, post and market town in the parish of Trevethan, upper division of the hundred of Abergavenny, county Monmouth, 8 miles from Newport, 10 from Abergavenny, and 18 S.W. of Monmouth. It is a station on the Taff Vale Extension line, which branches off from the West Midland section of the Great Western railway at Pontypool Road, about 2 miles distant from the town. It is situated among the hills on the river Avon Llwyd, near the Brecon and Monmouthshire canal, and at the base of the bold elevation of Mynydd-Maen. It is supposed to have arisen out of the ancient village of Trevethan, and is now a busy manufacturing place.

The town, which is large, but irregularly laid out, is a polling-place for the county elections, and a petty sessions town. In the reign of Charles II., Thomas Allgood introduced the manufacture of japanned wares, in imitation of those brought from Japan, and his son invented a new process of polishing iron, called, from its having been first practised here, "Pont-y-Pool ware"; but these manufactures have since been transferred to Birmingham. The prosperity of the town was further secured by the Hanburys, who first made tinned and sheet iron here in the 17th century.

The town of late years has greatly increased in importance, and now contains many well-built houses and shops. The principal public buildings are the townhall, an Italian structure recently presented to the inhabitants by C. Hanbury Leigh, Esq., of Pontypool Park; a theological college, savings-bank, two commercial branch banks, a brewery, gas works, iron mills for making tin plates, and several extensive forges. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the neighbouring collieries, iron mines, and lime works with which this district abounds. There are tram-roads leading from the works in various directions.

In the vicinity are the hamlets of Pont-y-Moyle, Trostnant, Trefeddyn, and Varteage, at which last are situated the furnaces of the British Mining Company. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Llandaff, value £85, in the patronage of the Vicar of Llanover. The church, dedicated to St. James, is a very ancient stone structure with a small chapel of the Hanburys. There are places of worship belonging to the Roman Catholics, Baptists, Wesleyans, Independents, and Society of Friends, also National and other schools.

The principal residence is Pont-y-Pool Park, situated on rising ground on the right of the town, from which it is divided by the river Avon Llwyd. The views from its grounds are varied and extensive. The mansion contains paintings by Murillo and other eminent masters. The Pontypool Poor-law Union comprises 22 parishes or townships It is also the head of new County Court and superintendent registry districts. A court-leet is held annually for the lords of the manors of Wensland and Brynwyn, at which the stewards preside. Market day is Saturday. Fairs are held on the 2nd April, 22nd April, 5th July, and 10th October, for the sale of horses, cattle, and cheese."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]